Natural Viagra: Chinese Herbal Remedies

May 10, 2018 By admin

Natural Viagra: Chinese Herbal Remedies

One remedy called Libidfit or Libex certainly does. The first product of its kind to be vetted by the SATCM (the Chinese state agency set up in 1987 to oversee traditional Chinese medicines), this contains standardized extracts of a number of herbs that have been used in China to improve male sexual performance since the seventeenth century. In 1998, the formula was shown in a Beijing University study to improve sexual function in over 90% of men with erectile problems.

This is a spectacularly high figure, especially when you compare it with the 60% success rates claimed for the pharmaceu­tical products on sale in the West. One reason for this is that the drug companies think of the erection as a purely hydraulic problem, and that using a simple and specific drug that opens the lock-gates is an appropriate strategy. The Chinese, on the other hand, have long known that sex is a complex process, and it starts in the head. For this reason they have included in their formula­tion herbs that, like Viagra, contain compounds that block PDE-5 and relax the blood vessels that supply the penis. But they have combined these with other herbs that appear to act on dopamin­ergic nerves in the brain; nerves that are involved in the mysteries of excitement and desire.

It is this intoxicating combination of increased arousal and per­formance that has been reported to make Libidfit the worlds first apparently genuine aphrodisiac. The 90% plus figure recorded in Beijing agrees pretty much with a recent Belgian trial, and the informal findings of andrologist Dr Ken Purvis, whose Oslo clinic is specially set up to measure and treat erectile dysfunction.

Libidfit s duration of action is up to 18 hours, and as it does not rely on PDE-5 inhibition, and indeed does not block the enzyme completely, it has a relatively low incidence of the side-effects typical of this group of drugs. Changes in blood pressure, for example, have not been reported, although we must wait for large-scale clinical trials for a definitive picture.

This herbal product is already in wide use as a sexual enhancer, but has a genuinely therapeutic role in middle-aged and elderly men with erectile dysfunction. Having said all this, it is also the case that if men looked after themselves more effectively, main­tained a healthy body weight, ate a better diet, smoked less or not at all, and took a reasonable amount of regular physical activity, most of them would have little or no need of it.

It is also true that over-the-counter products like Libidfit are not entirely free of problems. Erectile dysfunction can be symptom of diabetes and coronary artery disease, conditions which are often not diagnosed until very late in the day. It has been suggested that if men went to their GPs complaining of erectile difficulties, this might alert the doctor to diagnose the underlying condition, in the same way that opticians often diag­nose diabetes or hypertension during occular examinations. Men who self-medicate for their erectile problems, therefore, would be missed.

In the real world, unfortunately, many — perhaps most — men do not talk to their GPs about impotence; and many GPs are not yet as familiar with the idea of erectile dysfunction as a diagnostic as they should be. Basic screening involving taking a proper case history, and testing blood pressure and urinary glucose, would be more effective in picking up early cases of diabetes and vascular disease.

In any case treatments for erectile dysfunction are available to all via the web, and so the stable door – if not the bedroom door — is more or less wide open.

Although Libidfit is a natural and traditional remedy, and its active ingredient is quite distinct to Viagra, the Viagra patent is so all-encompassing that some patent lawyers are arguing that this 400-year old remedy belongs to Pfizer! The debate continues.